Home Learning

Simon Carter, Director at RM Education

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From today (21 Oct) the Government has made it illegal for schools to let isolating children sit at home without work – placing additional strain on teachers and remote learning models.

Responding to the news, Simon Carter, Director at RM Education, has commented on why this now means that remote learning technologies must be implemented by schools, and what it is that schools should be doing to manage this. 

Simon Carter, Director at RM Education:

“It’s no secret that the coronavirus outbreak has upended traditional teaching methods. And, with tougher Covid rules coming into force every day, it’s clear that remote learning is no longer a temporary feature – but a permanent one.

“In fact, remote learning has become so important that the Government has now felt compelled to introduce legislation – effective today – making it illegal for any school to let isolating children sit at home without work. For many schools, this won’t be the challenge it once was, having invested in some form of remote learning during lockdown and are accomplished at using it to continue the education of their pupils. For others who have yet to make this step, this is the “stick” to follow the “carrot” from the Government which has already offered to fully fund schools’ own remote learning capability.

“Importantly, this is not a wasted investment. Whilst the pandemic shows little indication of going away anytime soon, once we do get on top of it, the investment in remote learning will reap rewards for many years to come. Schools can use lockdown as the catalyst to adopt a “blended learning” approach, where remote education and classroom-based learning can work in tandem, allowing teachers to focus on what they do best. Quite simply, we have to look to the future, and recognise that if any good has come from the pandemic it has been to introduce new teaching techniques that should stand the test of time”.

Remote Education Temporary Continuity Direction: explanatory note 

An explanation of the Coronavirus Act 2020 Provision of Remote Education (England) Temporary Continuity Direction published 01 Oct 2020.

Documents

The Coronavirus Act 2020 Provision of Remote Education (England) Temporary Continuity Direction - explanatory note

PDF, 114KB, 2 pages

Details

The note explains each paragraph of the Coronavirus Act 2020 Provision of Remote Education (England) Temporary Continuity Direction

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What is home-schooling?

During the period when schools were closed to all but vulnerable children and children of key workers, most pupils were educated at home. This is known as home-schooling. While being home-schooled, children remained on their school roll and received a combination of support from schools, online learning resources such as Oak Academy, and other resources parents may have provided themselves. Home schooling in this instance is different to elective home education, which is where parents choose not to send their child to school full-time on a long term basis.

What you need to know about school attendance

From the start of the autumn term 2020, all pupils have been able to return to schools. The new term means attendance is mandatory and the usual rules on attendance apply. This includes parents’ duty to ensure their child, of compulsory school age, attends their registered school regularly.

Schools are operating in line with guidance, which sets out the public health advice they must follow to minimise the risks of coronavirus (COVID-19) transmission.

What is Elective Home Education (EHE)?

Elective Home Education (EHE) is when a parent chooses not to send their child to school full-time but assumes responsibility for making sure their child receives a full-time education other than at school. Some children are electively home educated from age 5 and may never attend school. In other cases, a child may be removed from their school’s roll for EHE.

Educating children at home works well when it is a positive choice and carried out with proper regard for the needs of the child. In many cases, elective home education is appropriate, well-delivered and involves the parents in considerable sacrifice.

What you need to know about EHE

EHE requires parents to take full responsibility for their child’s education, including all associated costs (such as exam fees).

Schools are not required to provide any support to parents that have withdrawn their child for EHE. Support provided by Local Authorities (LA) is discretionary, including support for a child’s special educational needs.

Parents should not be placed under pressure by schools to electively home educate their child. This is a form of ‘off-rolling’ and is never acceptable

If you feel under pressure to keep your child at home and educate the child yourself rather than sending them back to school full-time, we recommend you discuss this with your LA.

Thinking about EHE?

If you think EHE might be in the best interests of your child, the Government expects your LA to coordinate a meeting with you involving your child’s school and social workers where appropriate. We strongly recommend you meet with your LA to consider whether EHE is appropriate for your family and your child before you decide whether to withdraw them from their school’s roll.

Where a pupil is withdrawn from school for EHE, there is no obligation for the school to keep that place open. If the parent wishes to return their child to school, they may not be able to return to the same school.

Once a child is educated at home, LAs will begin making enquiries as to how suitable the education being provided is. Failure to satisfy the enquiry may result in you being issued with a School Attendance Order and / or the court may make an Education Supervision Order.

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@1851Trust, @TeamINEOS UK’s official charity, launched their online #STEM education resources to further support remote learning as the 2020 summer term began. 

On October 12th 2019, Eliud Kipchoge became the first person in history to break the legendary sub-two-hour marathon barrier, recording a time of 1:59:40.2.

Following the history making moment at the INEOS 1:59 Challenge, the 1851 Trust, a charity committed to taking science beyond the textbook by engaging young people in the cutting-edge technology of high performance sport, launched three new, free, digital learning resources inspired by Kipchoge’s historic sporting feat.

Hosted on the Trust’s digital education platform INEOS STEM Crew, the resources, which are aimed at 11-16 year olds, take young people into the INEOS 1:59 Performance Team and explore the science and theory that went into giving Kipchoge the best possible conditions to make history in Vienna.

The resources have proved extremely popular – with an estimated 35,000 young people inspired so far - and are set to become even more so as this academic year continues. 

Commenting on the legacy of his challenge, Eliud Kipchoge said “It is brilliant to see so many schools are using the INEOS 1:59 Challenge STEM Crew resources, learning the science behind my record-breaking sub 2-hour marathon. I hope that my challenge will continue to bring STEM subjects to life for pupils and showcase that no human is limited.”

Following the successful launch of the resources in July, the Trust’s Education Team delivered a day of live lessons to the Bohunt Education Trust, with key worker pupils in school and hundreds of students learning at home. 

Director of Education at Bohunt Education Trust (BET), Phil Avery explained: “At BET, we provide excellence in education and prepare our students to become 'game-changers': to make a difference in the World and change things for the better. The project with INEOS STEM Crew highlights the power of multidisciplinary learning: how scientific concepts are applied, the importance of teamwork, how failure helps us move forwards - and creativity and dreaming inspire ambition.”

Feedback received from pupils and their parents was extremely positive with one parent commenting: “My son was in school today and, for a child who isn’t into sport, he loved it. Your team did a fantastic job making the day accessible not only to the few in the class, but to the hundreds learning online as well.” 

In celebration of the INEOS 1:59 Challenge anniversary, these live lessons have now been made available on the site. The resources focus on three key aspects of the huge task Kipchoge and the INEOS 1:59 Performance Team faced; the pacemaker strategy, nutrition and course selection. Students can put themselves into the roles of the INEOS 1:59 Challenge Performance Team and investigate what it takes to do something that has never been done before, running a sub-two-hour marathon, by carrying out engaging hands-on practical work in physics, biology and maths.

The resources include class-facing presentations, activity and lab sheets as well as a project workbook to guide students through the challenges. All lessons are fully linked to the UK National Curriculum and are completely free www.stemcrew.org/ineos159challenge


INEOS and the 1851 Trust, a charity committed to taking science beyond the textbook by engaging young people in the cutting edge technology of high performance sport, launched three new free digital learning resources inspired by Eliud Kipchoge’s historic sub-two-hour marathon.

The digital education resources, aimed at 11-16 year olds and available for free online from July 2020, take young people into the INEOS 1:59 performance team and explore the science and theory that went into giving Kipchoge the best possible conditions to make history in Vienna.

The three challenges focus on three key aspects of the huge task Kipchoge and the INEOS 1:59 Performance team faced; the pacemaker strategy, nutrition and course selection. Students can put themselves into the roles of the 1:59 Performance team and investigate what it takes to do something that has never been done before and run a sub-two-hour marathon by carrying out engaging hands-on practical work in physics, biology and maths. 

  • On 12th October 2019 Eliud Kipchoge became the first person in history to break the legendary sub-two-hour marathon barrier, recording a time of 1:59:40.2.

  • Kipchoge was supported by the INEOS 1:59 Performance team, led by Team INEOS’ Sir Dave Brailsford, who applied scientific knowledge and high performance principles to give Kipchoge the best possible chance of success.

  • INEOS and the 1851 Trust have launched three new free digital education resources aimed at young people aged 11-16 on STEM Crew inspired by the science behind Eliud Kipchoge’s history making moment.

INEOS and the 1851 Trust, a charity committed to taking science beyond the textbook by engaging young people in the cutting edge technology of high performance sport, have launched three new free digital learning resources inspired by Eliud Kipchoge’s historic sub-two-hour marathon.

Whilst the INEOS 1:59 Challenge was undoubtedly first and foremost a feat of incredible human achievement, to provide Kipchoge with the optimal conditions required to take the 26 seconds off his previous attempt at breaking the barrier required a significant amount of innovation and scientific expertise. 

The work of the INEOS 1:59 Performance team, led by Team INEOS’ Sir Dave Brailsford, combined the brightest minds in high performance sport to ensure that from the course selection and optimisation, to the weather analysis, to the aerodynamics and more, no stone was left unturned.

The digital education resources, aimed at 11-16 year olds and available for free online today, take young people into the INEOS 1:59 performance team and explore the science and theory that went into giving Kipchoge the best possible conditions to make history in Vienna.

The three challenges focus on three key aspects of the huge task Kipchoge and the INEOS 1:59 Performance team faced; the pacemaker strategy, nutrition and course selection. Students can put themselves into the roles of the 1:59 Performance team and investigate what it takes to do something that has never been done before and run a sub-two-hour marathon by carrying out engaging hands-on practical work in physics, biology and maths. 

The resources include class-facing presentations, activity and lab sheets as well as a project workbook to guide students through the challenges. All lessons are fully linked to the UK National Curriculum and are completely free. 

Eliud Kipchoge said: 

“The INEOS 1:59 Challenge combined science and sport to prove that no human is limited. Sport can inspire, bring positivity and unify people and I wanted to bring that message to the whole world. 

“To help me make history I had a fantastic team behind me with a lot of expertise in science and high performance. It was important to me that Challenge left a legacy for the future generation and it is great that INEOS and the 1851 Trust are now using the science behind 1:59 to educate children across the world. 

“Without the scientific and technological knowledge of my team and the INEOS 1:59 team I would not have been able to make history in Vienna.”

INEOS 1:59 Challenge CEO and TEAM INEOS Team Principal Sir Dave Brailsford said: 

“Eliud is a once in a generation athlete and in the INEOS 1:59 Challenge it was our responsibility to use our knowledge to give him the best possible conditions which would enable him to make history and prove that no human is limited. That is why we had some of the brightest minds in high performance sport work closely together with Eliud’s brilliant team.

“A huge amount of science and high performance principles went into the project, covering everything from the pacemaker formation through to the decision to hold the event in Vienna. It was always Eliud’s dream to leave a legacy and it is brilliant to see INEOS and the 1851 Trust now take the learnings from the Challenge and turn them into educational resources to inspire young people across the world.”

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The National Museum of Computing (@TNMOC), an independent charity, has today announced its new online remote learning packages which go live on October 1st. The remote learning packages extend the highly successful in-person programmes, reimagined for the online learning world, giving students an interactive and fun experience with STEM subjects during a difficult time for teaching.

For the museum’s online remote learning programme, they are offering 45-minute sessions with two themes to choose from: World War II codebreaking or modern electric computing – as well as the choice to do both. The programmes can be tailored not only to support schools but also universities, colleges, home education groups and academics.

Each remote learning session includes a live guided virtual tour and two live hands-on interactive sessions. In the live interactive sessions, students will get a choice of three activities: experiment using a Python programme to act as Lorenz keys to decipher messages, programming experience through the BBC emulator or a virtual reality session to create a virtual WWII era Block H, where the museum is housed now – generously provided through CoSpaces, an educational AR & VR creation platform. 

Following the remote learning sessions, teachers will also gain access to a multitude of resources to use throughout the term around their STEM teaching, including access to 4 programs custom written for BBC Basic and Python, the museum’s online learning pack, and a 30 day trial of CoSpaces’ pro platform – as well as a recording of the students’ own virtual tour to reuse throughout the school year. 

The aim of the remote learning packages is to help encourage students to engage with STEM subjects and to inspire the next generation of software developers, hardware engineers and beyond; hoping to give students a deeper understanding of the technology around them. The sessions will show that the students themselves can be involved in developing the technology of the future, inspiring those interested to get engaged.

On the museum’s new remote learning packages, Education Coordinator for TNMOC, Anne-Marie Langford says: ‘the new remote learning packages provide expert knowledge and access to the museum’s collection from the safety and comfort of your classroom or learning space. The packages give students a positive learning experience which differs from the usual classroom lesson, offering first-hand insight into key STEM concepts, leaving students with a new-found perspective and, hopefully, inspiration to get more involved in STEM.’

Even though The National Museum of Computing houses historic computers, it continues to be at the forefront of innovation and creativity. 

About The National Museum of Computing

The National Museum of Computing brings to life the history and ongoing development of computing for the enjoyment and benefit of the general public and specialists. The Museum combines a distinctive approach to engagement with an emphasis on British computing heritage and on-going innovation. TNMOC acquires, conserves, restores and rebuilds historic computing machinery. Our approach is furthered through a process of engagement, with the display and demonstration of historical systems. The Museum runs a highly successful learning programme for schools and colleges and introduces computer coding to young people to help inspire the next generation of computer scientists and engineers. The Museum also runs a popular, on-going program of festivals, lectures and interpreted displays and interactive events.

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The ‘Learning in a changing landscape’ report details the lessons educators can learn from lockdown when developing digital strategies and approaching edtech, such as gamifying the experience 


Belfast, 29th September 2020: COVID-19 has placed global education in an unprecedented state of flux, with school closures affecting 1.2 billion students in 181 countries to date. Now the UK and other countries face the threat of a second wave, with tightening restrictions and the possibility of further school closures. In preparation, Texthelp, the learning technology company, has commissioned educational analyst ImpactEd to look at the impact of remote and blended learning on pupil motivation and how technology can help address this going forward. 


The ‘Lockdown and beyond: Learning in a changing landscape’ report draws on ImpactEd’s longitudinal research project surveying more than 11,000 UK students throughout lockdown, and existing evidence on how COVID-19 impacts student motivation in the UK, US and Australia. It shows lockdowns in each country have not only created a range of new challenges for educators, but also deepened existing long-term problems and inequalities. In particular, the evidence shows COVID-19 has led to acute challenges in three linked areas –  student motivation, teacher workload and student wellbeing. 


Pupil motivation is important because it has a direct link to attainment. The study found that only 34% of surveyed UK pupils had felt actively motivated during remote learning, with the majority neutral or actively disinterested. Students from disadvantaged backgrounds have reported lower levels of persistence than their peers in every two weeks since the beginning of May. This drop in motivation is expected to continue as home and blended learning contexts become normalised.


The paper provides insights on how schools can get the most impact from technology in a remote or blended learning environment. Whilst the paper highlights the ‘Zoom boom’ in edtech, with a 158% global surge in edtech tool downloads in March 2020, it concludes research-based tools that encourage engagement through real-time feedback and gamification, as well as provide pupil autonomy, will likely have the best impact on student outcomes and teacher workloads. 


The report also highlights how:

  • Teacher working hours have increased by 60-65% as a result of the pandemic

  • Lockdown has had a bigger impact on girls, with the wellbeing scores of those surveyed a full 5% lower than boys

  • Teacher burnout is significantly associated with weakened motivation in pupils


Commenting on the findings of the report, Texthelp’s CEO Martin McKay said:

“As educators increasingly look to technology to support their practices, this paper highlights the importance of prioritising evidence-based solutions that drive student motivation. Writing, for example, is one area where real-time feedback from a research-backed tool can have significant impact, encouraging students to write more and for longer periods when they do not have the motivating benefit of a teacher in the room. 

“At their most effective, edtech tools should complement in-person learning, reducing teacher workloads so they can focus on what really matters – teaching. The rapid digitisation in education brought about by necessity presents opportunities to embed solutions and practices that best support learning, both during this pandemic and beyond.”  

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