In this day and age, technology plays a key role in our everyday lives. We now live in an era where people are so consumed by smartphones, tablets and computers, which is shaping how we communicate, shop and work. As these technologies have evolved, so has their adoption rate – particularly in schools.

By embracing technology in the classroom, it is entirely transforming the way that schools teach, and the way children learn. The use of tech during class means that tech can be integrated into everyday learning and lesson plans, opening new methods of learning.

Online training providers, Theknowledgeacademy.com, sought to find out how valuable technology is in the classroom. According to a recent report by Smoothwall, a staggering 96% of teachers believe technology has had a positive impact in the way children participate and learn in lesson. A further 56% of respondents in their survey said that pupils were noticeably more engaged when technology is used.

The Knowledge Academy also found the following highlights from the report:

·         49% of teachers admit tech has made them more efficient at planning and giving lessons – a third claim it makes marking easier

·         54% of teachers said tech allows them to plan more varied and exciting lessons

·         According to 53%, technology makes the classroom more vibrant and fun

However, using technology in the classroom hasn’t been met without disapproval. The Knowledge Academy identified from the report that a third of teachers are worried about using technology in class because they are concerned they cannot control what each child is doing whilst in use. Adding to this, more than one quarter of teachers are concerned about children being able to access inappropriate material online.

As a result, Theknowledgeacademy.com sought to find out what parents think about the use of technology in school. The Knowledge Academy surveyed 5,279 parents around the UK.

Questions included:

1.      “Do you think tech has a positive impact on your child’s grades?”

2.      “Do you believe using technology in class is a distraction?”

The survey found that, altogether, parents are happy for their children to use technology in the classroom.

64% of parents assert that tech has become more integrated into the way teachers teach and students learn, with 93% believing technology is a valuable tool in student learning. However, it must be noted that only 1 in 3 parents believe schools are doing an “excellent” job using technology for this purpose. A further 68% say technology has increased their ability to help their children with school work.

Further results reveal the following opinions from parents surveyed:

·         91% of parents say tech has made it easier for them to be involved with their child's education

·         78% of parents using technology to monitor their child's grades

·         46% play educational games with their children daily to consolidate what their child has learnt during the day

Despite all the positives, 35% of parents think their children are already inundated with too much tech access every day, and 19% think classroom technology use is a distraction that hurts the quality of their child’s education.

Sophie Thomas, a parent from London, said:

“In our current digitally-driven world, it is vital that students become familiar with technology from a young age. Children will learn the skills and knowledge that they must have to thrive in our fast-moving society.”

She added: “I must admit I wasn’t so keen on the idea of my child using technology frequently in the classroom, and was one of the parents that complained about the idea. However, now I have seen it in action, it has had a positive impact on the way my daughter is working. Being more interactive and hands-on has allowed my child’s grades to improve significantly.”

Joseph Scott, a spokesperson for The Knowledge Academy, said:

“The nature of teaching and learning has become much more collaborative in recent years. And now, with the rise in technology available to schools, we are stepping into a whole new world of innovation and creativity – with technology the possibilities are endless.”

He added: “There is no doubt that tech has had a positive impact on the classroom, both for students and teachers. The traditional methods of teaching are disappearing, as technology, if used correctly, can better engage students and help teachers, and parents, monitor their progress more effectively. Ultimately, the use of technology in the classroom should help to ensure children leave school with better qualifications, suited to a world where technology is so crucial.”

Marie, a secondary school teacher from Bristol, said:

“With pupils, these days having a plethora of devices at their helm, it makes a lot of sense to tap into this world and see how they can be combined. Whilst the norm does tend to be that smartphones should not be used during teaching hours – we need to change this approach and consider how they can be utilised to aid pupil’s development.” 

She added: “I personally want my pupils to use readily available apps and websites that allow them to select answers or vote on options to questions I create on topics we have been learning in class. This will not only make lessons more fun, but inject some enthusiasm to those pupils who often find lessons boring and not engaging enough.”

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