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LONDON NURSERY ON HOW IT SUPPORTS ITS NEURODIVERGENT CHILDREN FOR AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH

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Autism Awareness Month throughout April is internationally recognised to raise awareness of those on the autistic spectrum. This year marks the 15th anniversary of the first awareness month for the neurodevelopmental disorder and those close to someone on the spectrum will know that supporting them is not just important for the one dedicated month of the year – it’s for life. 

Three Little Birds Nurseries, located throughout London, is sharing how it supports the neurodiverse children who attend its nurseries and why it’s important for them to have their voice heard.

James Morris, Joint CEO of Three Little Birds Nurseries with cousin Ed Morris, said:

“We pride ourselves on the support we give all children at our nurseries and we understand that children with autism or any other neurodevelopmental disability may need more support than other children.

“As any child develops, they are finding their feet and are learning from many new experiences almost daily. With children with autism, this can be overwhelming and we strive to provide an environment which bears this in mind. Their parents can be rest assured that their children have a routine which caters to their needs.

“Every child with autism struggles with social interaction, finding it hard to process verbal information, especially in active, strange environments and with heightened emotions.

“We use visual tools as a wonderful way to offer support, providing the chance to understand what’s happening without having to process social communication at the same time.” 

At the nursery’s Chingford Forest branch, its new ‘stretch and grow’ room is a sensory wonderland for the children to explore. With colourful fairy lights, butterfly decals and a little reading nook, the room offers a place for children to decompress. 

Part of one of the nursery's sensory rooms.PNG

Ed said: “The ‘stretch and grow’ room at Chingford Forest is a really pleasant place to be in for all children, but the sensory play is hugely beneficial for autistic children. The social setting of a nursery is important for them to develop social skills but for when it’s too much – a sensory room is ideal to let them take the day at their own pace.”

Three Little Birds Nurseries offers opportunities to the children to attend that may not be found in the average nursery – including performing arts to ensure neurodivergent children have a creative outlet to progress their holistic development. The West Finchley branch is just one of its nurseries that has a state of the art Performing Arts studio providing the perfect space for the children to express themselves. 

The performing arts studio has space for music, drama and dance.PNG

Holistic development, meaning the cultivation of physical, emotional, social, spiritual and mental health, encourages interaction and social abilities. 90% of a child’s brain development occurs before the age of 5 and at Three Little Birds Nurseries, a holistic approach to caring for special educational needs children is important to allow them to grow at their own pace.

For more information about Three Little Birds Nurseries and the support it provides for its children, visit https://threelittlebirdsnurseries.co.uk/

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