From education to employment

Credit crisis inspiring Brits to rethink their career paths, says LSC survey

More than half the country’s workers (57 per cent) are worried about their job prospects as a result of the credit crisis, according to a survey conducted on behalf of the Learning Skills Council.

However, the survey also reveals that almost half (51 per cent) remain confident that they would be able to keep their jobs and that they would be concentrating on training to improve their job security and careers prospects.

The research suggests that the recent collapse of retail giants like MFI and Woolworths has not yet had the demoralising effect on the nation’s workforce many predicted.

The economic downturn is, however, driving people to rethink their career paths in a positive way, with 77 per cent of respondents recognising the room for improvement in their skill levels, and indicating a willingness to seek advice about improving their skill base. Two thirds of workers (62 per cent) also said that learning a new skill would help make them feel happier and more secure in their jobs.

Skills Minister Lord Young said: “It is more important than ever that people have the opportunity to improve their skills to help them in the workplace. We are investing over £4 billion in further education and skills this year alone and Government is committed to making sure that everyone has the opportunity to gain new skills. I would encourage everyone who wants to maximise their skills to take full advantage of this investment."

A further 44 per cent of respondents stated they believed an increase in their training or skills levels would help them safeguard their current careers, with only 15 per cent believing a complete change of career or retraining would be necessary.

Chris Banks, Chairman of the LSC, commented: "It’s true that learning new skills and retraining can lead to a refreshing career change, but it’s also important to realise that employees with transferable skills are often seen as the biggest assets to employers. A small investment in learning new skills will make you better prepared to tackle any eventuality, particularly in a tough economy.

"It’s true that learning new skills and retraining can lead to a refreshing career change, but it’s also important to realise that employees with transferrable skills are often seen as the biggest assets to employers. A small investment in learning new skills will make you better prepared to tackle any eventuality, particularly in a tough economic climate."

Pictured: Chris Banks, Chairman of the LSC

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