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Autistic people asked for their views to help transform support to develop their skills and independence

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A new call for evidence is asking people for their views on what is working and where more needs to be done to transform care and support.

This consultation closes at  

Autistic people, their families and those caring for them are being asked for their views on how care and support in England can be improved.

The call for evidence is part of the cross-government review of the national autism strategy, which will be refreshed and launched later this year. The strategy will be extended to cover children as well as adults, so services work better for autistic people of all ages.

Autistic people, family members, carers and professionals can all take part in the online survey. The government is asking people to provide their views on:

  • how autistic people feel within their local communities and whether members of the public understand their needs
  • whether autistic people, their families and carers receive the right support for all their needs at the right time
  • how much autistic people are supported to develop their skills and independence
  • where progress has been made, and where it still needs to be made
  • what the key priorities should be for the future

People now have an opportunity to express their views on what is working and where more needs to be done to transform care and support. This could include:

  • in school through support to access the curriculum
  • at hospital through timely diagnosis
  • within the community through respite care or support to enter the workplace

There will also be face-to-face sessions with groups of autistic people, including children and young people.

Supporting people on the autism spectrum or with learning disabilities is one of the 4 clinical priority areas in the NHS Long Term Plan.

Consultation description

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In April 2014 the government published ‘Think Autism’, a strategy for meeting the needs of autistic adults in England. The strategy supports the Autism Act 2009.

This year the Department of Health and Social Care, working with the Department for Education, will review the strategy and extend it to cover children as well as adults.

To help us do this, we want to hear about people’s experiences of care and support.

This call for evidence is for England only. It will be of particular interest to:

  • autistic people – adults, children and young people
  • their families
  • their carers
  • organisations and professionals that provide care and support to autistic people or work with autistic people

We will use the results to find out where people think progress has been made and where more needs to be done in the future.

Documents

Review of the National Autism Strategy ‘Think Autism’: call for evidence

Review of the National Autism Strategy ‘Think Autism’ – survey for autistic people (print version)

Review of the National Autism Strategy ‘Think Autism’ – survey for families, carers and organisations (print version)

Ways to respond

Respond online

or

Write to:

The Autism Policy Team 
Dementia and Disabilities Unit 
Room 1N14 
The Department of Health and Social Care 
Quarry House 
Quarry Hill 
Leeds 
LS2 7UE

Minister for Care Caroline Dinenage said:

Autistic people must be at the heart of any improvements we make to their care and support. This is an opportunity to make a real difference to hundreds of thousands of lives. We want services from healthcare to education to work better for autistic people of all ages – it’s no coincidence that learning disability and autism are one of the clinical priorities in the NHS Long Term Plan.

Please get involved and share your views so we can work harder than ever to improve care and support for autistic people, their families and carers.

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