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Brexit’s Got Talent and it’s Europe Bound

Mark Brownridge, Director General of the Enterprise Investment Scheme Association
Canvas Grimsby In Article Block

Brexit’s Got Talent: 28% of the UK’s 9-5ers believe there will be greater opportunities for skilled-workers in the rest of the EU after Brexit

The Enterprise Investment Scheme Association have commissioned a nationwide sentiment study to analyse the thoughts of a UK workforce charged with picking up the post-Brexit pieces and driving an EU-free private sector forward post its formalisation. Commissioned across 2004 respondents, the research paints a disconcerting picture of caution and fear; the UK is an undeniably talented nation of intellects, engineers, developers and innovators, but the direction of this globally benchmarked ‘skilled-talent’ is certainly not land-locked.

Key insights from the full body of research include: 

  • 35% of UK workers worried about the lack of upskilling among the national workforce during and after the negotiations 
  • 32% of employees believe highly-skilled job opportunities will move from the UK to the EU post-Brexit 
  • 22% of those in the North East are considering leaving the UK to look for opportunities elsewhere
  • 31% think the UK workforce will be lower skilled and less talented post-Brexit

The report – launched today – offers further insight into the crossover between the academic and professional business arenas, and whether the former can truly support the latter as we move towards a post-Brexit future.

  • 28% of Brits believe there will be greater opportunities for skilled-workers in the rest of the EU after Brexit
  • 20% say that working in the post-Brexit UK private sector is less attractive than before
  • 38% of people in Wales, and 45% of those in Scotland, believe that high-skill opportunities are leaving the UK due to Brexit
  • 14% are considering leaving the UK to pursue academic and professional opportunities abroad

 
The referendum results varied hugely across the UK’s regions. Two years on from the vote, and with one year to go, many people remain uncertain about the future direction of the nation’s high-skill sectors – all vital to the economic health of the country’s cities.

City Population   Voted for Brexit   Believe high-skill jobs will move to the EU
London 9,750,500 40.1% 37%
Birmingham   2,453,700 50.4% 19%
Manchester 1,903,100 39.6% 33%
Glasgow 1,057,600 33.4% 32%
Newcastle 837,500 49.3% 28%
  • 12m Brits said that their academic qualifications did not prepare them for their current career due to the technical nature of the field they are in
  • 32% would instigate a career change into a higher skilled sector later in life but don’t feel they have the academic or professional support to do so
  • 13% are considering leaving as they feel there are more career opportunities outside of the UK
  • 19% believe there are more highly skilled job opportunities outside of the UK, and this will increase post-Brexit

Mark Brownridge, Director General of the Enterprise Investment Scheme Association, said of the results:

“Overall EISA has repeatedly heard from SMEs that they are more worried about the lack of skilled labour coming in from the EU to provide them with the technical skills and workforce they require to drive their business forward due to a lack of technically skilled people. Any policy that prevents moving across the globe for work would be detrimental for UK small businesses, so it is a priority for the Government to ensure that free movement of travel across borders is maintained. At the same time the results serve as a call to action to the Government to ensure that the future of the UK’s high-skilled workforce is preserved and nurtured to grow.”

Smartening up? 31% – 16 million employees – think the UK workforce will be less skilled and less talented post-Brexit

  • 14% of the UK workforce – just over seven million workers – are considering leaving the UK to pursue academic and professional opportunities abroad amidst the formalisation of Brexit
  • One in five of the UK’s workforce consider working for the private sector less attractive post Brexit – 10.5million people nationwide
  • 35% are worried about the lack of upskilling among the UK’s workforce during and after the negotiations 
  • Just under 35 million – 67% – of us stay rooted post Brexit yet 13% are considering leaving the UK due to a perceived increase in career opportunities outside of the UK
  • 31% – 16 million employees – think the UK workforce will be less skilled and less talented post-Brexit 
  • One in five of us – just over 10million –  feel there are more highly skilled job opportunities for us outside of the UK, and this will increase post-Brexit
  • 32% – 16.5 million people – believe highly-skilled job opportunities will move from the UK to the EU post-Brexit 
  • 38% of people in Wales, and 45% of those in Scotland, believe that high-skill opportunities are leaving the UK due to Brexit
  • 28% of the UK’s 9-5ers believe there will be greater opportunities for skilled-workers in the rest of the EU after Brexit
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